Toolmaking
September 1, 2007
Entry Details
 

# 563
Simon Gingras
Montreal, QC
Dimensions (inches):  
  Width:   3.1875
  Height:   2.00
  Depth:   1.625
Materials:   Tool steels, Brass



Everyone remembers a certain time in childhood when collecting rocks and hoarding them as treasure was an acceptable practice. Being a grown man and doing the same can produce smirks and burst of laughter from one’s peers. I had to find an excuse. I did in the Japanese art of Suiseki. Basically one takes a stone one particularly likes and makes a little stand for it so that one may appreciate its shape and beauty without being laughed at.  For more information I direct you to this webpage http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suiseki.



After cutting the back of a stone flat with a ceramic saw I found that it was quite hard to get the stone to lie flat inside its little pocket in the stand. What I needed was a Suiseki stand pocket depth uniformer. After finding out the hard way that even my small router plane was too big I decided to make a really small router plane just for that purpose.
 



The body of the tool was milled out of a scrap piece of 2” diameter tool steel. Possibly H13 or S7 but I cannot be sure as it was just lying there in the scrap box. The whole thing milled, sandblasted and surface ground.


 



The cutter was made of 3/16” thick O1 tool steel. Hardened to Rc 62-65 and then ground all over. The knobs and the lock screw retainer are of turned, milled and sandblasted mild steel.

Last I modified and polished some over the shelf brass screws to assemble the whole lot.
 



In this picture you can see the working position and the relative size of the tool.
 



This is what prompted this little tool making exercise. Now if I hear anybody snicker about the guy picking nice rocks in the parking lot…  
 

Judges Comments
Brian : a little known hobby has found a tool! cool!
CS : OK, serious now: I want this tool. If you ever make another one and want to sell it, please drop me a line (the other judges were worried I might steal this tool). This thing is a jewel. It’s mechanically perfect. Every detail is crisp and clean. And the machine-age design is hugely appealing to me. And it works like crazy.
Clarence : Basically an old design with a modern bend. Well done and a great user.

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