Peppermills
December 15, 2006
Entry Details
 

# 468
Brian Campbell
Markham, ON
Dimensions (inches):  
  Width:   4 1/4
  Height:   15
  Depth:   11
Materials:   Bocote, Big Leaf Maple Burl, Dyed Black Veneer, 18 in. Grinder

My design was first captured on paper. My choice was a simple, yet elegant design that showed its beauty through the strong grain of the wood.  The size of the mill was chosen for its easy daily use, while displayed on a kitchen counter top.

I cut the maple burl to size after I made a cutting sled for the table saw.  The sled allowed the segments to be cut at 22.5 degrees to make an octagon disc.  The veneer was cut to size and glued to the segments.  The pieces are then put into a press and band clamped at the same time.

The discs are hand sanded on the lathe, until they are flat.  The Bocote wood is cut to size, and because of the beautiful grain of the wood, cuts were kept to a minimum so as to not disrupt the flow of the grain.
 
 

Picture No. 1

This photo shows the body (top) of a peppermill I’m making with the same construction methods.  I turn the top of the mill on a 7 mm pen mantle. The body is turned between centers with a homemade drive center and a cone on the live center in the tailstock

A 1 1/16 Forester bit is mounted in the tailstock and the boring of the body is done. The bottom disc is then turned in a #3 jaws to be finished and sanded.  It is then pressed to the rest of the body.

The body is turned to shape and the top and body are sanded together.  The sanding process starts at 100 grit and finished at 3600 micromesh.
Tung oil sealer was used for the first coat.  I sand 600 to 3600 grit with each coat.  The inside and outside is finished in Salad bowl finish with eight applications.  The final sanding goes to 12,000 micromesh.
 
 

Judges Comments
bob : Another good simple design. Very appropriate use of laminations and wood contrasts.
Mary : Nice simple design. Laminations add to the decoration.
nick : Good choice of materials. Great job of laminating. Shape is simple and works well with materials.

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